When writing the perfect job description, it’s essential to keep in mind that your posting should comply with the job board’s guidelines.

If your position doesn’t get published because something doesn’t meet job board standards, we’ll notify you to correct it.

Company requirements

  • Your complete company name should be listed and advertised on job boards. Avoid abbreviations of any kind.

  • You have to be an identifiable employer with public contact details or other verifiable information.

  • You’ll need to have a functioning company website that matches the company name on your account and lists your organization’s physical address.

  • Your email address must match the company website domain (e.g., your email is [email protected], and the company website is www.company.com). If you are using another address (such as Gmail), it must be listed on the contact page of your website.

Job Title

  • Make the job title clear, direct, and specific so candidates can easily search it. Most people search for positions that match their skills and experience, so using terms like ‘rockstar’ and ‘ninja’ in job titles and descriptions can confuse job seekers.

  • Avoid too long titles (no longer than 80 characters), ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, or exaggerated punctuation to keep things simple.

  • Information like salary, job location, or similar recruiting language (e.g., “hiring now!”, “high commission”) in the title could be considered spammy.

  • The title should only include a single position. If you’re hiring for multiple openings, you should still title it as the singular position (e.g., “Developers” or “Salespeople” should be “Developer” and “Salesperson”).

Job Location

  • Country, State/Region, and City are all required fields when promoting a position. If your job posting is for remote work, tick the ‘Fully remote’ box, and enter the head office as the job’s location. If you provide a location, your job is more likely to be posted because job boards will know where to post it.

  • Don’t publish the same position in multiple locations unless there are separate openings in different offices. Each job opening should only be posted once, or it may be flagged as a problem by job boards.

Job Description

  • Include enough details so candidates can understand the duties and requirements of the position. You should have at least 700 characters in total. Consider including information about your perks and benefits or company details to make the job more appealing.

  • Use formatting options like headings, bold text, and bulleted lists for requirements to make your description easy to read. Format your text directly in TalentLyft, as pasting formatted text may lead to formatting issues on some job boards.

  • Try to avoid providing alternative ways for a candidate to apply, like email addresses, phone numbers, or website links.

  • Use neutral, unbiased language. Job boards will reject posts with discriminatory or biased language.

    Example:

    ✗ “We are looking for a developer with at least 3 years of experience” or “We are looking for a youthful, energetic salesman.”

    ✓ “We are looking for a developer with experience in X software” or “We are looking for a salesperson.”

  • To make your job posting language more neutral and inclusive, double-check whether your requirements are strictly job-related. Instead of mentioning protected characteristics like race, sex, age, religion, ethnicity, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, family status, disability, medical or genetic condition, focus on:

    • Experience in your industry

    • Knowledge of tools you’re using

    • Tasks that employees should manage independently

Other requirements

  • Some job boards may not accept jobs if you’re already posting there directly or from another source.

  • Some job positions may not be available for free job boards and can only be published with sponsored visibility. Jobs promoted nationwide, or in a different market than the office’s physical location, commission-based positions, self-employment, volunteer work, or unpaid internships are only eligible for paid postings on some premium job boards.

  • Most job boards do not accept posts that advertise short-term work, multi-level marketing programs, solicitation by intermediaries, or solicitations for purposes other than direct job-specific employment (such as career fairs.) Such adverts are simply out of scope for job search sites, whether they represent a legitimate career opportunity or not.

  • All job boards may not accept jobs if they are frequently reposted. For long-running positions, we recommend using paid job board options for the best visibility.

We’ve tried to cover most reasons job boards refuse to post certain positions, but the guidelines above are not a comprehensive list. We’ll always do our best to ensure your positions get as much exposure as possible in all the right places and let you know where we think you can make improvements.

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